The longer a judge has been without a break, the less likely you’ll get parole

 The longer a judge has been without a break, the less likely youll get parole

A study in Israel showed that judges more likely to grant parole right after they take a break than after they’ve been working for a while. (The graph above show favorable decisions vs. the time of day with the circles representing breaks.)

Denzeger thinks that the judges’ behaviour can be easily explained. All repetitive decision-making tasks drain our mental resources. We start suffering from “choice overload” and we start opting for the easiest choice. For example, shoppers who have already made several decisions are more likely to go for the default offer, whether they’re buying a suit or a car. And when it comes to parole hearings, the default choice is to deny the prisoner’s request. The more decisions a judge has made, the more drained they are, and the more likely they are to make the default choice. Taking a break replenishes them.

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